LEAD Action News

LEAD Action News Vol 2 no 4 Spring 1994.  ISSN 1324-6011
Incorporating Lead Aware Times ( ISSN 1440-4966) and Lead Advisory Service News ( ISSN 1440-0561)
The journal of The LEAD (Lead Education and Abatement Design) Group Inc.

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Predictors of tooth-lead level with special reference to traffic. A study of lead-exposure in children.

by Troels Lyngbye, Ole N. Hansen and Philippe Grandjean

Reprinted from the International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Springer-Verlag 1990;62(6):417-22.

Abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1700966

Full: http://download.springer.com/static/pdf/337/art%253A10.1007%252
FBF00379057.pdf?auth66=1352845162_e4e58d5c7068ba89518ee17234b9def8&ext=.pdf

wpe17.jpg (30292 bytes)Summary: Possible predictors of the lead burden of children were investigated in a low-exposure area. A total of 1,302 school children in the first form within the municipality of Aarhus, Denmark, donated deciduous teeth for determination of the lead concentration in the circumpulpal dentin. The families were interviewed on possible sources of lead. Present and former addresses of residences and day-care institutions were obtained, and the traffic intensity was estimated at each of these addresses. Children with a high lead burden resided significantly more often in heavily travelled streets than children with a low burden, but only during their first 3 years of life. The increased risk for a high lead burden was related to the traffic intensity in a dose-response manner.  Further, children with a high lead burden more often exhibited  pica, their mothers smoked more during pregnancy, and their fathers were more likely to work at a garage or shipyard In a logistic multivariate regression, such parental occupation increased the risk for a high lead burden 1 5-fold (O Radj; P = 0 03), whereas tobacco and traffic each were of borderline significance (O Radj = 1 4, P = 0 08). 

Key words: Indirect exposure Lead absorption Pica - Tooth-lead Water-lead

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